Dungeness shack and lighthouse

[Following on from part 1] Oh Dungeness. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. With a motley selection of shacks, cold war era military buildings and lighthouses watched over by a nuclear power station, it's like a child has shaken up a bag of toy buildings and tipped them out in this unlikely spot.

Prospect Cottage, Dungeness

It was lovely to chug into it, past Derek Jarman's Prospect Cottage on the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, an unexpected sight in an area already crammed full of the incongruous.

Simon Conder House, Dungeness

It hasn’t changed much in ten years, apart from the addition of two rather nifty modern houses by Simon Conder. The first, near the power station is fascinating. Conder stripped back an original shack to its shell, which in this case was a railway carriage. This was retained as a kitchen corridor and a modern house built around it. There are some interior photos and an interview over at Gabion. It must be very odd living here. Beautiful at times but also very exposed. I was careful to make sure the house was empty before taking photos, but it’s on the beachfront (as it were) so there’s nothing to stop people gawping in your window.

Simon Conder Rubber House, Dungeness

Further along, near Prospect Cottage is another Conder development, clad in black rubber. The Airstream caravan provides temporary accommodation for guests.

For an area where there is almost literally, nothing to see, we had a great time. The kids played about on the beach while I sat and enjoyed the view. More photos at Urban 75 and in the Dungeness Flickr pool

oh you lucky lot - it's ace ain't it. i'm jealous as all hell.
x

And you didn't even mention the incredible bird-watching opportunities that Dungeness offers. Or that it is the only area of Britain officially classified as desert!

Hi Dick,

I didn't know about the birds and I wasn't sure if that thing about the desert was actually true. It seemed so unlikely I didn't even bother checking it.

What's there in the way of birds?

'Countryfile' did a feature on it a few years ago where they went on about the desert thing. If John Craven says its true...its true. It is one of the best places in the country for rare migrant birds.
http://www.dungenessbirdobs.org.uk/lateframe.html
I saw a Marsh Harrier down there last year while I was at ATP!

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