Cramond Island

We visited Cramond Island last week, which is a small island near Edinburgh, separated from the mainland by a causeway. When the tide goes out the island becomes accessible for 4 hours at a time before the causeway is submerged again.

Cramond Island

The island can only be reached by foot or bike so it's a popular spot for a stroll. The causeway is about a mile long and very impressive, made from triangular concrete bollards, designed to keep speedboats out of the Firth of Forth.

Cramond Island

The island is uninhabited but it was once a popular holiday destination. There are hidden remains of cottages and more prominently, abandoned WWII gun emplacements that frame a beautiful view of the shoreline.

Cramond Island

We've been here a few times but never at the right time to get across. It was a triumph to make it finally, and it had the air of adventure that comes with visiting an inaccessible place. It couldn't have been a better day either - what a scorcher.

Cramond Island

Endless photos of bollards in this Cramond Island Flickr set.

Portable1-mat.jpg

These PorTables (get it?) tablemats featuring photos of vintage portable record players rock my world. A collaboration between soft furnishing designer Ella Doran and Kavel Rafferty (who is behind the great Record Envelope blog) there are 6 in the set. They are a little bit too gorgeous to eat off, but still.

Portable4-mat.jpg

Available from Ella Doran's online shop and her real shop in Cheshire St, London.

Slow graffiti

Slow, innit, round these parts. I lost my blogging mojo but I think it's coming back. Hope so anyway.

How are you all? Having a nice summer? Bit wet up here but that's nothing new.

Cultybraggan Camp

While in Comrie, we also visited Cultybraggan Camp, the most complete remaining POW camp in the UK (according to this source). It was built in 1939 and covers 8 acres in a remote spot of Perthshire countryside, containing over 100 Nissen huts in varying states of repair.

Cultybraggan Camp

The whole site has been bought by Comrie Development Trust, who are in the process of turning it into a community resource. It's a large site and the area towards the back is now hired out to businesses and used for allotments. The enormous firing range that sits behind them is kind of incongruous, but it's great to see the land being put to good use.

Cultybraggan Camp

Quite a few of the huts have been renewed and repaired ready for tenants.

Cultybraggan Camp

Other are left exactly as they were when the MoD left - mattresses on the floor, forgotten furniture, tattered posters and remnants of military life.

Cultybraggan Camp

They do scrub up nicely. This hut (close to a ginormous nuclear bunker, just in case) is now someone's office.

The site is open from morning until dusk so anyone can go in and have a look around. I'm still reading up on it all hence the lack of background in this post, but there's some good info on Secret Scotland. More photos on Flickr.

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