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Clifton Cathedral

I recently visited Clifton Cathedral in Bristol, or the Cathedral Church of SS Peter and Paul, to give it its Sunday name. [Wikipedia]

Clifton Cathedral interior
The Nave with original Robin Day chairs

The Roman Catholic cathedral was designed by Ronald Weeks and a team from the Percy Thomas Partnership, and was completed in 1973. It is now Grade II Listed.

Clifton Cathedral altar and organ

Hexagons and equilateral triangles are key to the design of the whole building.

Clifton Cathedral, Bristol

It had just reopened for services again as restrictions were lifted.

Clifton Cathedral - William Mitchell Stations of the Cross
Stations of the Cross by William Mitchell

“Originally intended to be executed in stone (it was thought that these would be damaged by later building work), the Stations were made by William Mitchell using Faircrete (a mixture of concrete, resin & nylon fibres). The artist was asked about what reaction people had to his work: ‘Well the work is a bit hairy I suppose, but then so was the experience of crucifixion.’” – from Wikipedia.

Clifton Cathedral - concrete bin

Even the bins are carefully designed. The walls show the shape of the timber used to cast the concrete.

Clifton Cathedral, Bristol

Enjoy a virtual tour in David Essex’s video for Oh What a Circus.

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Warm winceyette

Winceyette bed jacket, John Ferguson, Perth

This is John Ferguson’s in Perth. One of the few remaining traditional urban outfitters.

John Ferguson, Perth - shop window

Two shops on either side of County Place have been clothing the denizens of Perth since 1924.

Rucksacks, John Ferguson, Perth

One side sells outdoor equipment and workwear. The other, clothes and ‘napery’ (household linen).

John Ferguson, Perth - shopfront

Ferguson’s recently amalgamated these shops into new premises at South Methven Street. I’m sad now that I was there on a Sunday and didn’t get a chance to see inside.

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Glasgow Doors Open Day 2019 – part 2

Following on from Glasgow Doors Open Day highlights, here are a few places to go outside the city centre.

Get your name in headlines with Glasgow Press and Newspaper Club

Starting in Govan, Glasgow Press (Saturday only) is a real treat. Enjoy the smell and noise of old-timey letterpress printing, and get your name in headlines with a personalised newspaper, a collaboration with Newspaper Club. You can also enjoy a look at Govan’s historic graving docks while you’re there.

Heading further south, Camphill Gate, a historic tenement, and Langside Halls (across the road from each other) are interesting, and further afield Holmwood House, a spectacular Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson villa is worth the trip.

Govanhill Picture House

And I can’t wait to see what’s behind the doors of Govanhill Picture House.

Arlington Baths slipper room 2012

In the west, Arlington Baths is one of my favourite buildings in the whole of Glasgow. This well-preserved Victorian baths has so many fantastic features, most famously the superb Turkish Baths. Not to be missed! I will be going along to see if the Slipper Room is still as ramshackle as it was in 2012 (above). 

St Charles Borromeo church, North Kelvinside

St Charles Borromeo RC Church, North Kelvinside – Saturday only. A striking Gillespie, Kidd & Coia church. This is a short walk from Jaconelli’s Cafe on Maryhill Road if you need to be revived by ice cream.

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Glasgow Doors Open Day 2019 – City Centre highlights

Glasgow Doors Open Day is my favourite weekend of the year. So many amazing buildings, and every year there are new surprises. Here are a few of my favourites in the city centre, that don’t need to be booked in advance.

Glasgow City Chambers

Glasgow City Chambers, Saturday only. There are so many magnificent details in the City Chambers, it is always a surprise no matter how many times you visit. There are also free daily tours (Mon-Fri) during the rest of the year.

Garnethill Synagogue, Glasgow

Garnethill Synagogue, Sunday only. Excellent opportunity to see inside this beautiful building on Hill Street.

Glasgow Art Club

Glasgow Art Club, Bath Street. One for the Mackintosh fans.

Trades Hall, Glasgow

The Trades Hall, Merchant City. Lots of fun details in this historic Robert Adam-designed building.

The Pyramid, Anderson, Glasgow

The Pyramid, Anderston Kelvingrove Parish Church – striking Modernist church easily spotted by its green pyramid roof.

Also worth seeing:

  • The Tenement House, Garnethill. A chance to see this National Trust property for free. It’s a fascinating glimpse of tenement life as it once was.
  • Britannia Panopticon Music Hall. Always fun to visit, the Panopticon advertises itself as the world’s oldest surviving music hall. It has regular open days throughout the year.
  • Glasgow Evangelical Church – a little hidden gem near Glasgow Cathedral.

I am also looking forward to tours of the Mitchell Library, Barrowlands Ballroom and Tennent’s Brewery.