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Glasgow archive photography round-up

Alan Dimmick

Alan Dimmick is a Glaswegian photographer, best known for photographing Glasgow’s art scene. He is posting archive photos on Instagram at the moment, fascinating to me because many are taken around Hyndland/Partick/Anniesland where I grew up.

The Windsor Cafe on Clarence Drive was my first local cafe, a real treasure trove of sweets and ice cream. The owners, pictured here, were a Scots-Italian brother and sister, with infinite patience from what I remember.

Jonathan Treen

Temptation - 1970s photographs by Jonathan Treen
‘Temptation’, Glasgow © 1977-2020 Jonathan Treen

Jonathan Treen is also posting archive photos of 1970s Glasgow on Twitter (@JonathanTreen) just now. Some of the locations are instantly recognisable, others changed beyond recognition.

Glasgow Swing Park - 1970s photographs by Jonathan Treen
Glasgow swing park © 1977-2020 Jonathan Treen

Photos taken from this interview on Document Scotland.

Graham Gavin

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The Cyrkles, Gourock, 1995

A post shared by Graham Gavin (@grahamgavinarchive) on

Graham Gavin has some great photos of Glasgow’s music scene in the 1990s – some lost bands, and some familiar faces.

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Warm winceyette

Winceyette bed jacket, John Ferguson, Perth

This is John Ferguson’s in Perth. One of the few remaining traditional urban outfitters.

John Ferguson, Perth - shop window

Two shops on either side of County Place have been clothing the denizens of Perth since 1924.

Rucksacks, John Ferguson, Perth

One side sells outdoor equipment and workwear. The other, clothes and ‘napery’ (household linen).

John Ferguson, Perth - shopfront

Ferguson’s recently amalgamated these shops into new premises at South Methven Street. I’m sad now that I was there on a Sunday and didn’t get a chance to see inside.

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Irvine

Irvine - Gable End

I visited Irvine a couple of months ago, after winning a night out there in a raffle.

The fifth of Scotland’s new towns – the others are East Kilbride, Cumbernauld, Glenrothes and Livingston – it was added onto an existing (and very pretty in parts) historic town.

The vision for Irvine was spectacular space-age Brutalism. The reality doesn’t quite match the vision but there are some interesting things going on with bus lanes, and a strange predilection for tiny, irregular windows.

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The Bell, The Fish, The Bird and the Tree

St Mungo door knocker, Easdale Island

I’m not sure if any city is as proud of its coat of arms as Glasgow. You are never far from one – old or new, carved, engraved, painted, high or low – they are everywhere. Glasgow Coat of Arms started collecting them on Twitter @GlasgowCoA, and the crowdsourced results are currently on show at Glasgow City Heritage Trust in Bell Street until 6 Feb.

The story of St Mungo (Glasgow’s patron saint) and the book, the bell, the fish and the tree certainly caught my imagination at school, particularly the part about the salmon and the ring thrown into the river by the queen’s lover. That seemed a bit racey for primary school, particularly a Catholic one, but it did make saints seem cool.

I’m pleased to have contributed this wee St Mungo door knocker found on Easdale Island, 120-odd miles away from home. The collection is also on Instagram at instagram/GlasgowCoA and is growing all the time.

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Nick Cave: Until @ Glasgow Tramway

Until exhibition by Nick Cave at Glasgow Tramway

It’s the last couple of weeks of Nick Cave‘s exhibition, Until at the Tramway in Glasgow. Turns out there are two Nick Caves – this one is the Chicago-based artist, not the Australian Brighton-based singer.

Photos don’t really do it justice. It is crammed full of interesting objects, and each part of the exhibition offers up new surprises. On until 24 November.

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Glasgow Doors Open Day 2019 – part 2

Following on from Glasgow Doors Open Day highlights, here are a few places to go outside the city centre.

Get your name in headlines with Glasgow Press and Newspaper Club

Starting in Govan, Glasgow Press (Saturday only) is a real treat. Enjoy the smell and noise of old-timey letterpress printing, and get your name in headlines with a personalised newspaper, a collaboration with Newspaper Club. You can also enjoy a look at Govan’s historic graving docks while you’re there.

Heading further south, Camphill Gate, a historic tenement, and Langside Halls (across the road from each other) are interesting, and further afield Holmwood House, a spectacular Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson villa is worth the trip.

Govanhill Picture House

And I can’t wait to see what’s behind the doors of Govanhill Picture House.

Arlington Baths slipper room 2012

In the west, Arlington Baths is one of my favourite buildings in the whole of Glasgow. This well-preserved Victorian baths has so many fantastic features, most famously the superb Turkish Baths. Not to be missed! I will be going along to see if the Slipper Room is still as ramshackle as it was in 2012 (above). 

St Charles Borromeo church, North Kelvinside

St Charles Borromeo RC Church, North Kelvinside – Saturday only. A striking Gillespie, Kidd & Coia church. This is a short walk from Jaconelli’s Cafe on Maryhill Road if you need to be revived by ice cream.

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Glasgow Doors Open Day 2019 – City Centre highlights

Glasgow Doors Open Day is my favourite weekend of the year. So many amazing buildings, and every year there are new surprises. Here are a few of my favourites in the city centre, that don’t need to be booked in advance.

Glasgow City Chambers

Glasgow City Chambers, Saturday only. There are so many magnificent details in the City Chambers, it is always a surprise no matter how many times you visit. There are also free daily tours (Mon-Fri) during the rest of the year.

Garnethill Synagogue, Glasgow

Garnethill Synagogue, Sunday only. Excellent opportunity to see inside this beautiful building on Hill Street.

Glasgow Art Club

Glasgow Art Club, Bath Street. One for the Mackintosh fans.

Trades Hall, Glasgow

The Trades Hall, Merchant City. Lots of fun details in this historic Robert Adam-designed building.

The Pyramid, Anderson, Glasgow

The Pyramid, Anderston Kelvingrove Parish Church – striking Modernist church easily spotted by its green pyramid roof.

Also worth seeing:

  • The Tenement House, Garnethill. A chance to see this National Trust property for free. It’s a fascinating glimpse of tenement life as it once was.
  • Britannia Panopticon Music Hall. Always fun to visit, the Panopticon advertises itself as the world’s oldest surviving music hall. It has regular open days throughout the year.
  • Glasgow Evangelical Church – a little hidden gem near Glasgow Cathedral.

I am also looking forward to tours of the Mitchell Library, Barrowlands Ballroom and Tennent’s Brewery.