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A Parade of Shops: Window shopping

Mannequins in Ernest Whiteley's shop window, Bridlington

Some more photos from new photobook, A Parade of Shops. This time, a selection of shop windows. Above is Ernest Whiteley & Co in Bridlington, a truly stunning ladies outfitter, comfortable in its time warp. More photos at Modern Mooch.

J.M.Barnardo's shop window, Dublin

This is the window of J.M. Barnardo in Dublin, who claim to be the world’s oldest furrier. Opened in 1812, the founder’s son Dr Thomas John went on to found Barnardo’s charity.

Ladies' outfitter, Biggar

I find this arrangement, from a ladies’ clothes shop in Biggar, very soothing to look at.

Tam Shepherd's Trick Shop window, Glasgow

Finally, one of the few remaining joke shops, Tam Shepherd’s. Serving Glasgow’s guisers, partygoers and budding magicians since 1886. Still family run, its windows are always a treat to look at.

A Parade of Shops is available for £8 including UK P+P. See more of what’s inside.

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A Parade of Shops: The Specialists

George Mackay, Bowling Green Bowl Maker, Edinburgh
A beauty from Edinburgh.

The first run of Little Shops is now sold out – thanks for your orders. A Parade of Shops can now be ordered for delivery next week.

Mevagissey Shark Angling Centre

An unexpected find in Mevagissey.

Victoria Watchmakers, an old shop from Victoria Road in Glasgow

One from Victoria Road in Glasgow.

sid & jane camera, Warwick

I love everything about this, from modesty of the lower case names, to the wooden frontage and the lettering that looks like it’s made from giant Letraset (from Warwick)

Burgess Decor & Thimbles, Dingwall

A niche offering from Dingwall.

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A Parade of Shops: The Maximalists

The Aquarium, Glasgow
Pet shop / Eye test, Glasgow

Following on from The Minimalists, here are the Maximalists, where more is definitely…more. These all feature in new book A Parade of Shops – a celebration of little shops and shopfronts.

Ice Cream, Ice Cream, Great Yarmouth
So good they named it twice, Southport

You’ve got to admire the dedication of the shopkeeper who hauls this in and out every day.

Fancy Fair 59
What’s it called? Er, not sure, Great Yarmouth

Classic British combination of summer paraphernalia with easy to grab umbrellas.

Best Steak Pies in Glasgow

A Parade of Shops will be out next week. Early copies with the title Little Shops are currently on sale for £6.

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Coming soon: Little Shops

Little Shops: a phonebook by Anne Ward

After much swithering, I’ve finished photobook 3: Little Shops. As the title suggests, it’s a book full of little shops, shopfronts and shop windows – from the historic to the hysterical.

Here’s a sneak peak of what’s inside – Part 1: The classics

John R. Ferguson, Gatehouse of Fleet
C. Antoniou tailors, London
C. Antoniou, 248 Gray’s Inn Road, London
J D Adam, Brechin
J.D. Adam, 29 St David St, Brechin (shopfront now gone)
Optometrist, Burntisland
Ferrier & Mackinnon, 129 High Street, Burntisland

Little Shops is available to pre-order for £8 including postage. It will be published in early May.

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A postcard from Corrie

Sandstone Quay at Corrie on the Isle of Arran - harbour view with sheep

I found this idyllic harbour last week in Corrie on the Isle of Arran.

Sandstone Quay at Corrie on the Isle of Arran - harbour wall with sheep

Corrie lies on the north-east side of the island. It has two harbours – this one is known as Sandstone Quay because of the sandstone that was quarried locally and shipped from here.

Sandstone Quay at Corrie on the Isle of Arran - harbour view with black sheep and rocks

The sheep came from the Glasgow Garden Festival, and are a fun presence. There is also a lot going on rock-wise, if you like that kind of thing (I do).

Corrie shoreline with swan - Isle of Arran

The shoreline is full of plants, lichens, birds and sealife. The textures and colours are amazing.

The sand at Corrie, Isle of Arran

The colour of the sand is warm and inviting. It reminded me of butterscotch Angel Delight.

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New book: Chips and Ice Cream

Chips and Ice Cream by Anne Ward

Here’s a new photobook called Chips and Ice Cream. It’s a collection of 60 photos of classic cafes and chippies – a follow-up to Beside the Seaside.

Chips and Ice Cream - Ritz spread
The Ritz, Millport

These photos have been taken over the past 17 years, in cafes around the UK.

Chips and Ice Cream - Brucciani's spread
Brucciani’s, Morecambe

Some are legendary and have become tourist attractions in their own right.

The Savoy, Brechin

Others are quiet – out of the way and beautifully peaceful.

Kings Cafe/Queens Cafe, Glasgow (RIP)

Many of them have closed now. Two Glasgow cafes that have been open forever closed while I was editing the book, which makes the ones remaining feel even more precious. Support your local caff!

Copies cost £8 from the shop. Price includes UK postage.

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Bonus island: Luing

While we’re on the subject of islands, here’s Luing, from a visit in 2017.

Luing is one of the Slate Islands, in the same group as Easdale.

There is a small car ferry that runs from North Cuan on the mainland to South Cuan on Luing.

It is quite an unusual shape. The crossing takes about 5 minutes.

The island itself is great for walking. We walked from the ferry landing to Cullipool, the main settlement, and visited the Atlantic Islands Heritage Centre.

It was very picturesque and unspoilt – an easy way to get away from it all.

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What I did on my holidays: Part three – Lismore

Following on from What I did on my summer holidays: Part two – Kerrera

Island 3: Lismore

A white shed with a red corrugated iron roof on Lismore

Lismore is an island in the Inner Hebrides, reachable from Oban.

Church noticeboard on Lismore

It is 10 miles long (but fairly thin) and takes some time to explore.

View from Port Ramsay on Lismore

There are beautiful views everywhere.

Whitewashed houses at Port Ramsay, Lismore

And a lot of history. The Lismore Gaelic Heritage Centre tells the story of the island.

The Oban Achnacroish ferry passing the old pier on Lismore

Two ferries run to Lismore. The larger car ferry operated by Caledonian MacBrayne runs from Oban to Achnacroish in the centre of the island. The journey takes around 1 hour. Booking is recommended.

The Lismore-Point Appin ferry

At the north end of the island, a smaller passenger ferry runs between Point on Lismore, and Port Appin on the mainland. The crossing takes around 10 minutes.

Achnacroish ferry slipway on Lismore

We visited on a hot, clear day and it was spectacular. I look forward to visiting again for a better look.

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What I did on my summer holidays: Part two – Kerrera

Following on from What I did on my summer holidays: Part one – Easdale

Island 2: Kerrera

Kerrera is a small island near Oban. Cars are allowed for residents only.

The Kerrera ferry runs from Gallanach, 2 miles from Oban – follow the road round from the main ferry terminal until you get to the slipway.

The MV Carvoria is the smallest ferry in Calmac’s fleet. The crossing takes around 5 minutes, carries 12 passengers, and does not usually need to be booked.

There isn’t a lot to do on Kerrera apart from walk, but the walks are scenic, and full of wildlife. I was accompanied by a while-tailed sea eagle flying along the shore.

The Kerrera Tea Garden and Bunkhouse is a good landmark to aim for (open seasonally), and there is a well-stocked farm shop up the hill from the ferry landing.

Next: What I did on my holidays: Part three – Lismore